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Home Law Practices Estate Planning
Estate Planning - Lawyer - San Diego - Irvine
Article Index
Estate Planning
What is estate Planning?
What is involved in estate planning?
Who needs estate planning?
What is included in my estate?
What is a will?
What is a revocable living trust?
What is probate?
To whom should I leave my assets?
Whom Should I name as my executor or trustee?
How should I provide for my minor children?
When does estate planning involve tax planning?
How does the way in which I hold title make a difference?
What are other methods of leaving property?
What if I become unable to care for myself?
Who should help me with my estate planning documents?
Should I beware of someone who is a
What are the costs involved in estate planning?
All Pages

Who needs estate planning?

Whatever the size of your estate, you should designate the person who, in the event of your incapacity, will have the responsibility for the management of your assets and your care, including the authority to make health care decisions on your behalf. How that is accomplished is discussed below in this pamphlet.

If your estate is small in value, you may focus simply upon who is to receive your assets after your death and who should be in charge of its management and distribution. If your estate is larger, your lawyer will discuss with you not only who is to receive your assets and when, but also various ways to preserve your assets for your beneficiaries and to reduce or postpone the amount of estate tax which otherwise might be payable on your death.

If one does no planning, then California law provides for the court appointment of persons to take responsibility for your personal care and assets. California also provides for the distribution of assets in your name to your heirs pursuant to a set of rules to be followed if you die without a will; this is known as "intestate succession." Contrary to popular myth, if you die without a will, everything does not automatically go to the state. If you have any relatives (whether through your own family or that of your spouse), regardless of how remote, they will be your heirs ahead of the state. Nonetheless, they may not be the people you would want to inherit from you; therefore, a will is the preferable approach.