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Home Law Practices Estate Planning
Estate Planning - Lawyer - San Diego - Irvine
Article Index
Estate Planning
What is estate Planning?
What is involved in estate planning?
Who needs estate planning?
What is included in my estate?
What is a will?
What is a revocable living trust?
What is probate?
To whom should I leave my assets?
Whom Should I name as my executor or trustee?
How should I provide for my minor children?
When does estate planning involve tax planning?
How does the way in which I hold title make a difference?
What are other methods of leaving property?
What if I become unable to care for myself?
Who should help me with my estate planning documents?
Should I beware of someone who is a
What are the costs involved in estate planning?
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What if I become unable to care for myself?

If you do not make any arrangements in advance, a court-supervised conservatorship proceeding may be required if you become incapacitated.

Conservatorships are proceedings which allow the court to appoint the person responsible for your care and for the management of your estate if you are unable to do so yourself.

You should, therefore, select the person or persons you wish to care for you and your estate in the event that you become incapable of managing your assets or providing for your own care.

With respect to the management of your assets, the trustee of your living trust will provide the necessary management of those assets held in trust. However, to deal with assets which may not have been transferred to your living trust prior to your incapacity or which you may receive after incapacity, a durable power of attorney for property management should be considered. In such a power, you appoint another individual (the "attorney-in-fact") to make property management decisions on your behalf. The attorney-in-fact manages your assets and functions much as a conservator of your estate would function, but without court supervision. The authority of the attorney-in-fact to manage your assets ceases at your death.

A durable power of attorney for health care allows your attorney-in-fact to make health care decisions for you when you can no longer make them yourself. It may also contain statements of wishes concerning such matters as life sustaining treatment and other health care issues and instructions concerning organ donation, disposition of remains, and your funeral.